Finger Powered Mobile Phone Battery Charger


Originally posted on Zid's zone:

A mobile battery that could be charged by spinning it around your fingers! (It reminds me of the time when i was having fun spinning my audio cassette tapes around my fingers trying to manually rewind it). This concept gadget was designed by Song Teaho & Hyejin Lee . The concept design promises quick charging in places where a wall socket is not available to charge your mobile phone. Based on the

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Video Of The Planet’s Most Terrifying (and Fictional) Traffic Crossroads

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Originally posted on TIME:

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This article originally appeared on Lost at E Minor.

Oh my giddy aunt! This is most dangerous traffic intersection in the world. Thank your lucky stars it’s not a real one. With cars whizzing in all directions in endless streams and pedestrians carelessly braving the crossings by threading their way between speeding vehicles, just looking at this video has raised our heartbeat.

Thankfully this intersection doesn’t actually it exist, it’s the work of genius film-maker and editor Fernando Livschitz. By threading together different clips of the same crossroads in Argentina, Livschitz has masterfully created Rush Hour: a video of the planet’s most terrifying (and most fictional) traffic phenomenon.

(via Fastcodesign)

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Heidegger in Silicon Valley: Technology and The Hacker Way


Originally posted on Philosophy for change:

Racing-with-machines‘Software is eating the world!’ US tech luminary Marc Andreessen declared in 2009, on the eve of launching his venture capital firm, Andreessen-Horowitz. This extraordinary claim has become the mantra of Silicon Valley startup entrepreneurs, codifying a new philosophy of tech entrepreneurialism and kickstarting a bold new era of ‘creative destruction’. Decoded it means: software engineers are world-builders – so look out! Bored with building apps, games, and websites, the latest generation of tech entrepreneurs are creating social operating systems for the societies and economies of the future. Take the sharing economy startup Airbnb, for example (recipent of $112 million in funding from Andreessen-Horowitz in 2011). Andreessen claims:

Airbnb  makes its money in real estate. But … Airbnb … has much more in common with Facebook or Google or Microsoft or Oracle than with any real estate company. … Airbnb is building a software technology that is equivalent in complexity, power, and importance to an operating…

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The Single Most Proven Way to Get Smarter and Happier

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Originally posted on TIME:

Yes, It’s This Simple

Many of the fixes for our problems aren’t complex — something that’s clear in the things I recommend people do every day.

What’s a scientifically validated way to get smarter, happier, healthier and calmer?

Stop reading this right now and go for a walk.

It’s that simple.

Here’s why.

Exercise Powers the Body — and the Mind

They used to say you don’t grow new brain cells. They were wrong.

Via Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain:

As an illustration of just how new this territory is, I’ll go back to the story of neurogenesis, the once-heretical theory that the brain grows new nerve cells throughout life. “Ten years ago people weren’t even convinced that it happened,” says neurologist Scott Small. It was at his Columbia University lab, in 2007, where they witnessed telltale signs of neurogenesis for the first…

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There’s no app for good teaching

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Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

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8 ways to think about tech in ways that actually improve the classroom.

Bringing technology into the classroom often winds up an awkward mash-up between the laws of Murphy and Moore: What can go wrong, will — only faster.

It’s a multi-headed challenge: Teachers need to connect with classrooms filled with distinct individuals. We all want learning to be intrinsically motivated and mindful, yet we want kids to test well and respond to bribes (er, extrinsic rewards). Meanwhile, there’s a multi-billion-dollar industry, in the US alone, hoping to sell apps and tech tools to school boards.

There’s no app for that.

But there are touchstones for bringing technology into the classroom. With educational goals as the starting point, not an afterthought, teachers can help students use — and then transcend — technology as they learn.

Children as early as Pre-Kindergarten at Love T. Nolan Elementary School in College Park, Georgia have access to the iPad to reinforce techniques taught in the classroom. https://www.flickr.com/photos/116952757@N08/14161914543 Starting in pre-kindergarten, children at Love T. Nolan Elementary School in College Park, Georgia, have access to an iPad to reinforce techniques taught in the classroom. Photo by Amanda…

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How to teach a young introvert

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Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

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What should we do with the quiet kids? A conversation with Susan Cain on the future of classroom education.

Susan Cain sticks up for the introverts of the world. In the U.S., where one third to one half the population identifies as introverts, that means sticking up for a lot of people. Some of them might be data engineers overwhelmed by the noise of an open-floor-plan office. Others might be lawyers turning 30, whose friends shame them for not wanting a big birthday bash. But Cain particularly feels for one group of introverts: the quiet kids in a classroom.

Cain remembers a childhood full of moments when she was urged by teachers and peers to be more outgoing and social — when that simply wasn’t in her nature. Our most important institutions, like schools and workplaces, are designed for extroverts, says Cain in her TED Talk. [Watch: The power of…

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Eight things I learned from travel


Originally posted on Life After Liquidity:

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As I write this post I am sitting in the Caltrain, passing through various suburbs of the San Francisco Bay peninsula on my way to the city. It’s comforting to be surrounded by so many familiar sites once again.

My wife and I have had quite a journey: 17 countries, dozens of cities, and countless airports/train stations/bus stations. We’ve witnessed both staggeringly beautiful phenomena (Northern Lights in the Yukon Territories) and horrifying moments (a mob beating up some dude in the streets of Istanbul) along the way. Fortunately, my wife and I came out the other end of our trip completely safe and with a lifetime of memories.

I’ve delayed writing this post as long as I could; it’s been taking me a while to process what I’ve learned from this trip. The short answer is: a lot.

I may not be able to cover all the lessons I’ve learned…

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How to appeal to science denialists with raw work ethic


Originally posted on Unsolicited Honesty:

Two scientists are racing
For the cure of all mankind
Both of them side by side
So determined
Locked in heated battle
For the cure that is their prize
But it’s so dangerous
But they’re determined
Theirs is to win
If it kills them
They’re just humans
With wives and children
-Oklahoman American Rock Group The Flaming Lips

I read two things that got me to thinking about how to communicate about science to science denialists. The first is a piece at New Scientist, lamenting the fact that for all of the science on TV right now, we’re not exactly winning over science denialists with it. The second is an Amanda Marcotte piece over at Alternet, lamenting that the right wears ignorance as a badge of honor these days.

My suggestion? Humanize science, as a process. I hope to find a common ground between denialists and scientists, I hope that work…

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The Meaning of Happiness Changes Over Your Lifetime


Originally posted on Center for Advanced Hindsight:

Swinging Happiness for BlogThe following is a scientific and personal article written by CAH member Troy Campbell about happiness.

One lovely afternoon, I began chatting to my grandpa. I was completely unaware he was about to say something that would change my view of happiness forever.

In the middle of our conversation, I felt a lull so I pulled out the classic question. “If you could have dinner with one person, living or dead, who would it be?” I couldn’t wait to talk about my long list of dead presidents, dead Beatles, dead scientists, and a really cute living movie star. But I was also really eager to hear what he’d say.

Then he simply answered, “My wife.”

I immediately assured him it’s not necessary for him to answer like that. We all knew he loves his wife, whom he eats dinner with every night and was currently over in the other room…

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A park underneath the hustle and bustle of New York


Dan Barasch and James Ramsey have a crazy plan — to create a park, filled with greenery, underneath New York City.
The two are developing the Lowline, an underground greenspace the size of a football field.
They’re building it in a trolley terminal abandoned in 1948, using technology that harvests sunlight above-ground and directs it down below. It’s a park that can thrive, even in winter.