There’s No App for Good Teaching

Featured Image -- 857

Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

See all articles in the series

8 ways to think about tech in ways that actually improve the classroom.

Bringing technology into the classroom often winds up an awkward mash-up between the laws of Murphy and Moore: What can go wrong, will — only faster.

It’s a multi-headed challenge: Teachers need to connect with classrooms filled with distinct individuals. We all want learning to be intrinsically motivated and mindful, yet we want kids to test well and respond to bribes (er, extrinsic rewards). Meanwhile, there’s a multi-billion-dollar industry, in the US alone, hoping to sell apps and tech tools to school boards.

There’s no app for that.

But there are touchstones for bringing technology into the classroom. With educational goals as the starting point, not an afterthought, teachers can help students use — and then transcend — technology as they learn.

Children as early as Pre-Kindergarten at Love T. Nolan Elementary School in College Park, Georgia have access to the iPad to reinforce techniques taught in the classroom. https://www.flickr.com/photos/116952757@N08/14161914543 Starting in pre-kindergarten, children at Love T. Nolan Elementary School in College Park, Georgia, have access to an iPad to reinforce techniques taught in the classroom. Photo by Amanda…

View original 1,589 more words

Why Your Cover Letter Is More Important Than Your Résumé


«Today, a résumé scan or quick Google search can seemingly tell you everything you need to know about a job candidate: where they went to school, their work history, any major awards or achievements — the list goes on.» – Business Insider


«(…) a well-written cover letter is more important than an impressive résumé because it reveals your work ethic and attention to detail. It provides glimpses into your personality that a list of achievements can’t. »
«”I would rather have a determined, passionate individual with a strong work ethic on my team than an Ivy League degree without tenacity every single time,” she says. What it comes down to is hard work and dedicationyour résumé might boast impressive accomplishments, but it means nothing if you can’t prove that you’re genuinely passionate about the position

See also: How To Write The Perfect Cover Letter – Business Insider

What 5 Things Can Make Sure You Never Stop Growing and Learning?

Featured Image -- 897

Originally posted on TIME:

1) Keep Trying New Things

Having lots of hobbies is one of the secrets of the most creative people.

Via Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation:

Legendary innovators like Franklin, Snow, and Darwin all possess some common intellectual qualities— a certain quickness of mind, unbounded curiosity— but they also share one other defining attribute. They have a lot of hobbies…

Matt Cutts gives a great talk about how trying new things for 30 days not only helped him learn new skills but also changed him as a person.

2) Don’t Fear Failure

In Eric Ries’ acclaimed bestseller The Lean Startup he makes it clear that little bets, or “experiments”, are critical to moving a business forward in a safe fashion:

…if you cannot fail, you cannot learn.

Getting it wrong helps you get it right. Making mistakes is vital to improvement.

Via Where Good Ideas…

View original 639 more words

Futuristic Navdy Heads-Up Display Adds Safety to Driving


Viewing images on the windshield of the car is not exactly a new idea, but the technologies developed so far were concepts only designed for luxury models. The Navdy is a simple heads-up display (HUD) that projects notifications, apps, and driving directions directly from your smartphone to the windshield, guaranteeing to keep your eyes on the road.

The focus of this project is safe driving. The use of cell phones while driving is increasing accidents at an exponential rate worldwide. With Navdy, the driver can perform a series of tasks on their smartphone without taking getting distracted from the road or having to actually look at the device screen.

There are already systems that enable cellphone use by the driver through voice command, but the Navdy seems to do it masterfully. Besides projecting information to the driver, the device recognizes spoken commands and gestures. With this combination of features it allows the drive to answer calls, reply to messages, change songs, check the driving directions indicated on GPS, measure distances traveled and so on.

By its looks, you must have realized what makes Navdy be compatible with virtually any car: the device was designed to be simply attached to the dashboard and its see through HUD does not block the windshield. Furthermore, the device can even display information directly on the windshield of the car.

navdy

For the device to work, you must connect the Navdy into your car’s OBDII port. Besides providing energy, this type of connection also transfers information such as speed, current gear and if there are any mechanical problems.

It is clear that such a project has a few setbacks as well. The fixation to the dashboard needs to be strong enough to not come off in case of a collision, the gesture sensors must be fast so that no time-consuming movements would be necessary and the projected images must be clear for the driver to not get distracted trying to understand them.

But common sense should still apply: even with Navdy allowing the user to reply to a tweet, for example, it is still safer and more prudent to do so when not behind the wheel.

Source: Navdy

See more at: http://interestingengineering.com/navdy-heads-up-display-adds-safety-to-driving

8 Things I Learned from Travel


Originally posted on Life After Liquidity:

Travel Cover

As I write this post I am sitting in the Caltrain, passing through various suburbs of the San Francisco Bay peninsula on my way to the city. It’s comforting to be surrounded by so many familiar sites once again.

My wife and I have had quite a journey: 17 countries, dozens of cities, and countless airports/train stations/bus stations. We’ve witnessed both staggeringly beautiful phenomena (Northern Lights in the Yukon Territories) and horrifying moments (a mob beating up some dude in the streets of Istanbul) along the way. Fortunately, my wife and I came out the other end of our trip completely safe and with a lifetime of memories.

I’ve delayed writing this post as long as I could; it’s been taking me a while to process what I’ve learned from this trip. The short answer is: a lot.

I may not be able to cover all the lessons I’ve learned…

View original 3,753 more words

What Do the Words You Use Say About You?

Featured Image -- 944

Originally posted on TIME:

A lot.

Your personality can be determined just by looking at the way you text message. You can make accurate judgments about your favorite author’s personality just by reading their work. You can probably tell a great deal about my personality from the words I use in my blog posts.

Word choice can predict whether you’re depressed, suicidal or lying. Swearing makes you more persuasive. It’s true, asshole:

…obscenity at the beginning or end of the speech significantly increased the persuasiveness of the speech and the perceived intensity of the speaker. Obscenity had no effect on speaker credibility.

Word choice changes when you’re lying:

An analysis of 242 transcripts revealed that liars produced more words, more sense-based words (e.g., seeing, touching), and used fewer self-oriented but more other-oriented pronouns when lying than when telling the truth. In addition, motivated liars avoided causal terms when…

View original 817 more words

How To Teach a Introvert

Featured Image -- 848

Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

See all articles in the series

What should we do with the quiet kids? A conversation with Susan Cain on the future of classroom education.

Susan Cain sticks up for the introverts of the world. In the U.S., where one third to one half the population identifies as introverts, that means sticking up for a lot of people. Some of them might be data engineers overwhelmed by the noise of an open-floor-plan office. Others might be lawyers turning 30, whose friends shame them for not wanting a big birthday bash. But Cain particularly feels for one group of introverts: the quiet kids in a classroom.

Cain remembers a childhood full of moments when she was urged by teachers and peers to be more outgoing and social — when that simply wasn’t in her nature. Our most important institutions, like schools and workplaces, are designed for extroverts, says Cain in her TED Talk. [Watch: The power of…

View original 2,599 more words

What Teens Really Want To Know About Sex

Featured Image -- 910

Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

Remember how weird it was to ask questions about sex as a teenager? High school teacher Al Vernacchio answers his students’ questions about everything from DIY birth control to how to tell when a guy really likes you, in an excerpt from his new book.

On the first day of my Sexuality and Society class, I don’t pass around anatomy drawings. I don’t hand out pamphlets about safer sex, although those are stacked on a table near the door. Instead, the first thing I do is establish ground rules. People should speak for themselves, laughter is OK, we won’t ask “personal history” questions, and we’ll work to create a community of peers who care about and respect one another. Only then can we get to work.

I’m all about context. Talking about sexuality, intimacy, relationships, and pleasure can’t be done in a vacuum.

In the back corner of my classroom is an…

View original 1,365 more words

6 Things the Most Organized People Do Every Day

Featured Image -- 958

Originally posted on TIME:

Your life is busy. Work/life balance is a challenge. You feel like you’re spreading yourself so thin that you’re starting to disappear.

Most of us feel that way. But not all of us. The most organized people don’t.

As NYT bestselling author and neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin explains, the VIP’s he’s met don’t seem scattered and frantic.

They’re calm, cool and “in the moment”, not juggling nine things and worried about being done by 7PM.

It’s not hard to figure out why: they have help — aides and assistants to take care of these things so the VIP can be “in the moment.”

Via The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload:

In the course of my work as a scientific researcher, I’ve had the chance to meet governors, cabinet members, music celebrities, and the heads of Fortune 500 companies. Their skills and accomplishments vary, but…

View original 2,813 more words

The 5 Ws of Mobile Commerce Optimization


Originally posted on Technopreneurph:

The 5 Ws of Mobile Commerce Optimization image shutterstock 188282693

Everywhere you turn, it seems, people are talking about how understanding context is the most important aspect of building a better web.

No one, though, has captured it as well as Code and Theory’s Dan Gardner, co-founder and executive creative director of the creative agency, and Mike Treff, managing partner of the agency’s product design group, who wrote an article for FastCompany titled “The Next Big Thing in Responsive Design.” (Among other accomplishments, Code and Theory redesigned the LA Times website and Mashable, and created award-winning marketing programs for Burger King, Dr Pepper and Maybelline New York.) Though the whole thing is worth reading, this is the sentence that matters most for our purposes:

“As brands become more publisher-like, they’ll also need to incorporate a responsive philosophy that adapts to the user so that they can reach them at the right time, with the right messaging, and an understanding of…

View original 511 more words

How Office And Employee Engagement Apps Are Improving Work Life


Originally posted on Technopreneurph:

There’s an app for that.

No really, it is not just a catch phrase anymore! There is literally an app for almost anything you do in your daily life- from getting up in the morning to grocery shopping.

And while the apps for personal use are booming with programs that clip recipes and keep track of family schedules, there has also been an unprecedented amount of growth in app technology for offices and private businesses.

And for good reason.

Beyond IPad cash registers and attachments that make credit card swiping easy, mobile apps offer businesses of all varieties ways to streamline their work while keeping organized with the added bonus of saving a few extra trees.

Apps are truly here to stay and, if you find yourself in the unfortunate position of convincing your app-resistent company to jump on the bandwagon, here are a few points to get you started.

View original 609 more words

Google Aims to Archive All Human Knowledge


According to an intriguing report in New Scientist, Google is building a next-generation information database called Knowledge Vault that’s designed to index and store what we can reasonably term facts. And not just some facts — the Vault is intended to continually catalog and store all facts about our world and our history.

See also:  Google “Knowledge Vault” To Power Future Of Search Database could be the foundation for array of next-gen applications

The Vault project is building upon Google’s existing crowdsourced database, Knowledge Graph, and so far has cataloged about 1.6 million facts. Google researchers will present a paper on Knowledge Vault next week at the Conference on Knowledge Discovery at Data Mining, in New York.

It’s all part of a larger initiative, in the information technology arena, to improve the manner in which we interact with machines and databases. Similar knowledge bases are being built by companies like Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft and IBM.

One of the first practical applications for these ultra-database systems is to create a new generation of virtual personal assistants.

Down the line, the Knowledge Vault could serve as the foundation for advanced augmented reality networks. The database would provide instant data, via heads-up display, on virtually anything you look at.

The Knowledge Vault could also be used, eventually, to model all of human history and society as a vast collection of pure data. That knowledge, in turn, could be extrapolated to make predictions about the future.

Original Source
Other Source